Part 2: Fine Art Sculpture

Research

Surround You- reading

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MAI-THU PERRET

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Christine Ay Tjoe

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Jamie Hayon

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Josephine Pryde: In Case My Mind Is Changing

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Zoe

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Zoe Leonard Ariels 

Taken by me.

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Krzysztof Gil

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Gordon Matta- Clark

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Gordon Matta- Clark

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Garbage Wall, 1970 

Local refuse, acrylic polymer, cement, and soil 

Dimensions variable 

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What I find interesting about Gordon Matta- Clark's work is that he uses materials which are obsolete or items which no longer have a purpose to the user and so are discarded or taken for granted. Similarly, to my working process, I collect scraps or "rubbish" to build my sculptures like most artist do. According to the Artlyst article, what you see is " every imaginable kind of trash." For example, there are record discs which only last for a short period of time and kitchen utensils and it is literally what you see is what you get when you look at his work. Without these items we are unable to achieve to listen to music or cook but once it we have taken an action and used them for what they were designed for, we discarded them. Why because they hold no use to us but without them we become useless in my opinion. Restless and bored is what we become because we simply can not function with these objects (front of a vent, one bicycle wheel). In addition,  the sculpture carries bulk due to the familiarity with the objects (lego pieces) in the concrete and it is ironic how the concrete acts as a glue in which holds these materials together, forcing them to connect despite some of the items not having a direct relationship  by being from the same group. For example bicycle wheels and lego play bric are of different components which could not be grouped in the same category as mechanics. Further to this, the the shape is like an iceberg, it is sturdy, consistent and at a stand still. It need force to be moved, this could link to the fact that he confronts " the world of waste that modern society is busy, shamelessly constructing for itself." I feel as if he is trying to say that the world is full of rubbish or scraps that we waste but this is just the way things are in my opinion and we should just "get over it." I feel by using rubbish he may be highlighting New York's "infrastructural decline" and growing "homeless" population during the seventies. The use of soil could be assumed to be playing with the idea that these items are going to be burnt and turned back to the ground, back to soil- having no meaning and this vicious cycle is just the way things go. This happens everyday. Hence, the use of a simple cuboid to highlight the main point. It is indefinitely what it is is what it is. No, deep or physiological explanation needed. On the other hand, the use of a cuboid may be in relation to a foundation or home that is lacked. Knowing his interest in art and architecture could explain why he may feel there are no solid grounds for homeless people to live in and thus the use of trash may be used to symbolise what these homeless people had to live in. This may be due to the fact these trash objects were found on the streets which is where homeless people live.

 

Darren Almond

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Time Will Tell

Taken by me at the White Cube

 

Darren Almond

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Gordon Matta- Clark

Toast

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Martin Creed 

Work No 3071

Peanut Butter On Toast 

2018 

Patinated bronze, gold 

3.8 x 6.5 x 8cm/ 1 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 3 1/8 in

Taken by me.

 

Chris Burden- FAD Magazine snippet

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Chris Burden snippet of interview

Chris Burden- Measured

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Porsche with Meteorite, 2013 

Restored 1974 Porsche 914,

meteorite, and steel 

162 x 465 x 162 inches

411.5 x 1181.1 x 411.5 cm

 

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Taken by me.

1 Ton Crane Truck, 2009 

Restored 1964 F3350 Ford crane

truck with 1 ton cast iron weight 

168 x 274 x 96 inches

426.7 x 696 x 243.8

 

 

 

 

Chris Burden- Measured

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Elimination of recognisable shapes

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Franz West

Article written by Jan Verwoert on Franz West on Jun- Aug 2003

What I find interesting is that Verwoert refers to the "Adaptables" having " no function," "need" for your behaviour to be " determined" in "any way by it." This statement appeals to me because he speaks about Wests' work as if it is not living but to me the organic form is transitioning, it is moving but he is right in my opinion as if the  "Adaptables" are not dependent on the behaviour on a host. It is like the co exist by themselves. They are one with themselves. They determine their movement. Their fluidity. They are organically living without a purpose. Unlike bacteria for instance which has to rely on a host to breed, to reproduce. Speaking of reproduce his Adaptables are erotic and highly sensual. Therefore, there may be somewhat of a need to want to touch the form as they are bodily (using limbs) and unusual due to their lack of symmetry, giving his work "folds" and "creaks" like the human body- rolls on the stomach. However, what is ironic that some of his work such as: "Pabstüke" fit the "body" and " "brain" as though they are "organic extensions," it is not an intimate encounter. Meaning the object and the "user" have are basically acquaintances due to the fact their relationship is a"non- relationship." 

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1996 ( circa) 

Material: Metal, epoxy paint and cardboard

Dimensions: 52 x 41 x 17 cm

Another fascinating thing about this article 

The Elimination of Recognisable Forms

Eva Hesse

Untitled or Not Yet 

By Eva Hesse 

1996

nets, polyethylene, paper, lead weights, and cord

71 in. x 15 1/2 in. x 8 1/4 in. (180.34 cm x 39.37 cm x 20.96 cm)

Eva Hesse, Untitled or Not Yet, 1996

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Francis Upritchard

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Taken by me at the Barbican

 

What interest me about Upritchard's work is her variation to scale. As the exhibition progresses you notice her anamorphic genderless creatures which hold not one religion or culture increase in size. This can be assumed because this series "counter cultural." This may because the creatures may not hold as much importance as the archeological artefacts made out of clay as her work proceeds. Further to this point, as her work progresses she switches time, she ages further than backwards because if you look at the initial sculptures, they are appear to be in a time period pf the 1960's and this is apparent due to the vibrancy of the neon polymer and by using rainbow Aztec patterns.Radiating positivity and happiness. However, her archeological pieces which are made of clay (a material that is used traditionally for sculptures) appear to be ancient and appear to be carefully and skillfully crafted making them appear lost and keeping them preserved.

 

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Sculptural Performance

Francis Upritchard 

Barbican 

Taken by me.

Francis Upritchard transgresses from 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Language of Objects

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Peter Fischli David 

Weiss: Outlaws, 1984, chromogenic print, 113/4 by 91/2 inches, from the series " Equilibres ( A Quiet Afternoon)"." 

Jumex collection

Mexico City 

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Wasted Time

The Man of Constant Sorrow, 1986. From Equilibres (A Quiet Afternoon), 1984–86. Series of 45 gelatin silver prints and chromogenic prints, printed in two sizes: 30 x 24 cm and 40 x 30 cm, each in an edition of 3; expanded in 2006 to include 82 prints from the original negatives, 30 x 24 cm, edition of 3 complete sets; also published as artists’ book in 1985 (37 images) and 2006 (140 images)

 

" To celebrate boredom was also to go against the whole idea of the "inspired artist."- Peter Fischili

What attracts me to this influential duo is their humorous approach to their sculptures. In these sculptures it is obvious there is not exactly a perfect resolution. There is no right or wrong way to portray these objects such as ( plastic cups, scrap of wooden blocks, wires from the workshop). 

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frog 2.jpgTried to balance acrylic stick adjacently and symmetrically  above wooden stick and place the apricot above it but because of the weight of apricot posed to be too heavy it fell down. I tried to find a balance each time but this posed difficult as there was not enough support. 

Also, these objects are items I relate to as a practicing artist. These are everyday objects which easily lose value once they are used up. They hold no importance once they are discarded, to some. They may be identified as rubbish due to their emptiness. Consequently, they may be taken for granted. During an interview I watched on Youtube by Exhibition curators Nancy Spector and Nat Trotman speak about Weiss and Fischili's work "reframe everyday life" and play with " tension of opposites." This may be noticeable with their play with weight and height. Creating a dynamic of fear and unpredictability.

 

This is seen with the with the two chairs which rely on a cardboard which is bound to snap in seconds. It is almost like a performance. Weiss and Fischili create characters which dominate their surroundings likewise my peaches which could be linked today in social media as being an "bum" is seen as provocative and quirky. Especially, since they have holes  in often times appear to be anuses to some of my audience. I feel as if some of my work  mocks the way people utilise their everyday objects to the current presidency and operation in Nigeria at the moments. Just like how Weiss and Fischili appear to be testing which chair can sustain its ground and for how long? When will it all fall apart or how will you fall. Looking closely at these sculptures it is obvious the key words that resonate with me are dependency, gravity and trust.

 

For example in the picture above there appears to be an orange empty container placed directly above what appears to be a glass wine bottle. The orange juice bottle is resting at the tip of the edge, just patiently waiting to slip. Likewise, I am patiently waiting for the result of the current elections in Lagos as the future of Nigeria rest in our hands (Nigerians). The rule of gravity is what comes up most come down anyway and this is applicable in these series of works. The orange bottle is reliant on the glass bottle as support to carry its weight. It is tilted but uplifted. It is trying to find a balance to protect it from falling. The uncertainty makes their work unpredictable and daring. Sort of like trial and error. This uncertainty and doubt is in relation to a place. A place which I relate to called home. Lagos, the uncertainty of the elections. The future of Nigeria. Who will be our next president? Will Buhari( current president of Nigeria) reign again? When would our economy prevail. Who are to blame for our circumstances in Nigeria?  Us the people or solely the government. The I feel when it comes to who has governed Nigeria in the last 10 years. As if to see this is all a game. This is what I was trying to explore using my fruits. I would stick needle pins which are weightless, in an apricot which only achieved and doubt because the needle would sink too far deep into the apricot to be seen. Then I think if it is not be seen, then surely what is the point. This is only reproducing " wasted time" in my opinion. The use of apricots in my work representing hope for Nigeria's future. The orange bottle is no longer in control but reliant on not only the glass bottle below it but the foundation( small wooden piece) and balloon to stay afloat. Their series appears to be a game of trust and dependency. How much longer can one rely on each other before it crumbles and falls. Similarly, how  much longer will Nigerians depend on "faith," " hope" and "government" in order to induce beneficial and productive growth and change. What is next?

 

Snapshot of article taken from the Frieze website  

From this interview, it is clear that the balance of the composition gave the objects a right to be perceived as a piece of art in their own right. 

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Chiharu Shiota

Me Somewhere Else

 Taken by me- Blaine Southern gallery 

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Buckminister Fuller

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Michael Rakowitz

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1998- ongoing

Plastic bags, polyethylene tubing, hooks, tape

"Custom built" inflatable shelters" designed for "homeless" people that attach to the exterior outtake "vents" of a building’s "Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system". The warm air leaving the building simultaneously inflates and heats the double membrane structure. Built and distributed to over "30 homeless people" in Boston and Cambridge, MA and New York City."

The starting point of my project was inevitably to trap air but how to do this and for what purpose proved to be the problem. Using Rakowitz as an inspiration helped to influence the shape of my site specific project which was a dome. I realised I needed an easy shape to manipulate that would trap air and connect this to an external source that pumped out air and this was the vent in the classroom.

 

 

Cildo Meireles Volatile 1980–94 Photo: Tate Photography; courtesy of the artist

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Cildo Meireles

Glove trotter 1991

 

What intrigues me about this piece is that the work almost appears to be weightless and empty. His work almost seems like an illusion of a non existent form, like when you pinch a table cloth with the two front tips of your finger and what is left underneath is a shape occupied by air and nothing else. In doing this Miereles is creating some " independence" by creating a" space of their own." It is intangible but it is living and breathing as the form is showcased through the original shape it occupies. In a sense being like a figment of your imagination. Simply, like anxiety. A mental but not physical challenge. Something I have not been medically diagnosed with but have experienced myself. My 3 part piece which starts from the opening of the vent contains nothing but the air of which the shape occupies and the air around it. It is somewhat a magic tricking. It is tricking your brain to believe something is there but this is not the case, just like fear. By using a dome I was trying to visually encapsulate my fears. A dome is a familiar shape in which is used in architectural buildings providing shelter- safety- protection or even piece. However, in this instance a dome is a space in which my thoughts are trapped, circulating off the corners of the circumference of the dome trying to escape. Although, I am bigger than the dome I feel small and helpless and made to fight off my own thoughts on my own in my head and by myself. This is exactly how I feel when I get anxiety attack. Like I am somewhat stuck, trapped and panting for breath as my heart is being clenched from pain. Miereles Glovetrotter piece is sharp and invasive the space, it is obvious the space is forced and not organically grown. It is as if the steel metal mesh which appears to be a sandy landscape is fighting for dominance with the spherical shapes within it. The overview of the piece is futuristic. It is almost foretelling the future, what to expect or what to be suspected is the question that ponders in my mind while looking at this. 

 

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